Updated on 2024/03/30

写真a

 
MATSUDA,Goh
 
Organization
Faculty of Sociology Associate Professor
Title
Associate Professor
External link

Degree

  • 博士 (学術) ( 東京大学 )

Research Areas

  • Humanities & Social Sciences / Experimental psychology

  • Life Science / Basic brain sciences

  • Humanities & Social Sciences / Cognitive science

Papers

  • Subtle temporal delays of mothers' responses affect imitation learning in children: Mother-child interaction study. Reviewed

    Yamamoto E, Matsuda G, Nagata K, Dan N, Hiraki K

    Journal of experimental child psychology   179   126 - 142   2018.12

  • Mothers Exaggerate Their Finger Movements While Demonstrating Object Manipulation to Their Infants Reviewed

    Kaori Nagata, Eriko Yamamoto, Goh Matsuda, Kazuo Hiraki

    Psychology   9 ( 12 )   88390   2018.11

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    DOI: 10.4236/psych.2018.912149

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  • Preverbal infants affirm third-party interventions that protect victims from aggressors Reviewed

    Yasuhiro Kanakogi, Yasuyuki Inoue, Goh Matsuda, David Butler, Kazuo Hiraki, Masako Myowa-Yamakoshi

    Nature Human Behaviour   1 ( 2 )   2017.2

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    Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:Springer Science and Business Media LLC  

    DOI: 10.1038/s41562-016-0037

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    Other Link: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-016-0037

  • EEG-Based Mu Rhythm Suppression to Measure the Effects of Appearance and Motion on Perceived Human Likeness of a Robot Reviewed

    Matsuda Goh, Hiraki Kazuo, Ishiguro Hiroshi

    JOURNAL OF HUMAN-ROBOT INTERACTION   5 ( 1 )   68 - 81   2016

  • Infant discrimination of humanoid robots Reviewed

    Goh Matsuda, Hiroshi Ishiguro, Kazuo Hiraki

    FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY   6   1397   2015.9

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:FRONTIERS MEDIA SA  

    Recently, extremely humanlike robots called "androids" have been developed, some of which are already being used in the field of entertainment. In the context of psychological studies, androids are expected to be used in the future as fully controllable human stimuli to investigate human nature. In this study, we used an android to examine infant discrimination ability between human beings and non-human agents. Participants (N = 42 infants) were assigned to three groups based on their age, i.e., 6- to 8-month-olds, 9- to 11-month-olds, and 12- to 14-month-olds, and took part in a preferential looking paradigm. Of three types of agents involved in the paradigm a human, an android modeled on the human, and a mechanical-looking robot made from the android two at a time were presented side-by-side as they performed a grasping action. Infants' looking behavior was measured using an eye tracking system, and the amount of time spent focusing on each of three areas of interest (face, goal, and body) was analyzed. Results showed that all age groups predominantly looked at the robot and at the face area, and that infants aged over 9 months watched the goal area for longer than the body area. There was no difference in looking times and areas focused on between the human and the android. These findings suggest that 6- to 14-month-olds are unable to discriminate between the human and the android, although they can distinguish the mechanical robot from the human.

    DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01397

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  • Neural representation of face familiarity in an awake chimpanzee Reviewed

    Hirokata Fukushima, Satoshi Hirata, Goh Matsuda, Ari Ueno, Kohki Fuwa, Keiko Sugama, Kiyo Kusunoki, Kazuo Hiraki, Masaki Tomonaga, Toshikazu Hasegawa

    PEERJ   1   e223   2013.12

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:PEERJ INC  

    Evaluating the familiarity of faces is critical for social animals as it is the basis of individual recognition. In the present study, we examined how face familiarity is reflected in neural activities in our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. Skin-surface event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were measured while a fully awake chimpanzee observed photographs of familiar and unfamiliar chimpanzee faces (Experiment 1) and human faces (Experiment 2). The ERPs evoked by chimpanzee faces differentiated unfamiliar individuals from familiar ones around midline areas centered on vertex sites at approximately 200 ms after the stimulus onset. In addition, the ERP response to the image of the subject's own face did not significantly diverge from those evoked by familiar chimpanzees, suggesting that the subject's brain at a minimum remembered the image of her own face. The ERPs evoked by human faces were not influenced by the familiarity of target individuals. These results indicate that chimpanzee neural representations are more sensitive to the familiarity of conspecific than allospecific faces.

    DOI: 10.7717/peerj.223

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  • Brain response to affective pictures in the chimpanzee Reviewed

    Satoshi Hirata, Goh Matsuda, Ari Ueno, Hirokata Fukushima, Koki Fuwa, Keiko Sugama, Kiyo Kusunoki, Masaki Tomonaga, Kazuo Hiraki, Toshikazu Hasegawa

    SCIENTIFIC REPORTS   3   1342   2013.2

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP  

    Advancement of non-invasive brain imaging techniques has allowed us to examine details of neural activities involved in affective processing in humans; however, no comparative data are available for chimpanzees, the closest living relatives of humans. In the present study, we measured event-related brain potentials in a fully awake adult chimpanzee as she looked at affective and neutral pictures. The results revealed a differential brain potential appearing 210 ms after presentation of an affective picture, a pattern similar to that in humans. This suggests that at least a part of the affective process is similar between humans and chimpanzees. The results have implications for the evolutionary foundations of emotional phenomena, such as emotional contagion and empathy.

    DOI: 10.1038/srep01342

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  • A Humanoid Robot Activates the Human Mirror Neuron System Reviewed

    MATSUDA Goh, KANDA Takayuki, ISHIGURO Hiroshi, HIRAKI Kazuo

    認知科学 = Cognitive studies : bulletin of the Japanese Cognitive Science Society   19 ( 4 )   434 - 444   2012.12

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:日本認知科学会  

    Many types of humanoid robots have been developed recently, and they are mainly<br> designed for social interaction with human beings. The most communicative partners<br> for human beings are other humans. Therefore, to develop successful communicative<br> robots, it is important to know how closely they resemble a human. In the present<br> study, we attempted to evaluate the human likeness of a humanoid robot (Robovie)<br> by using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Since activity of the human mirror neuron<br> system (MNS) is thought to reflect the perceived human likeness of observed agents,<br>we compared MNS activity during observations of an action performed by a human<br> and the robot. Seven male and ten female participants were included in the study, and<br> eventually, fourteen of them were analyzed. NIRS probes were placed at the bilateral<br> premotor and primary motor areas, which are components of the MNS. Under obser<br>vation conditions, stimuli were presented live or on a video monitor; there were four<br> observation conditions, namely, live-human, live-robot, video-human, and video-robot.<br> After the observation conditions, the participants executed the same action performed<br> by the human agent in the observation conditions by themselves (execution condition).<br> We identified the NIRS channels in which significant activation was induced under both<br> the observation and execution conditions, and used this information to determine the<br> possible regions reflecting MNS activity. We found no significant effect of the agent<br> (human/robot) on MNS activity, and this indicated that MNS response in the motor<br>related area is relatively analogous irrespective of the agent (human/robot). However,<br>the effect of the mode of presentation (live/video) was found in a few channels. Two<br> channels corresponding to the left ventral premotor cortex were activated more strongly<br> in the live condition than in the video condition, particularly when the agent was the<br> human. In contrast, one channel corresponding to the right primary motor cortex was<br> activated more strongly in the video condition than in the live condition only when the<br> agent was the robot. These findings suggest that live presentation of action is necessary<br> to reveal true brain activity in actual situations.

    DOI: 10.11225/jcss.19.434

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  • Event-related potentials in response to subjects' own names: A comparison between humans and a chimpanzee. Reviewed International journal

    Hirata S, Matsuda G, Ueno A, Fuwa K, Sugama K, Kusunoki K, Fukushima H, Hiraki K, Tomonaga M, Hasegawa T

    Communicative & integrative biology   4 ( 3 )   321 - 323   2011.5

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    The sound of one's own name is one of the most salient auditory environmental stimuli. Several studies of human brain potentials have revealed some characteristic waveforms when we hear our own names. In a recent work, we investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) in a female chimpanzee and demonstrated that the ERP pattern generated when she heard her own name differed from that generated when she heard other sounds. However, her ERPs did not exhibit a prominent positive shift around 300 ms (P3) in response to her own name, as has been repeatedly shown in studies of human ERPs. The present study collected comparative data for adult humans using basically the same procedure as that used in our previous study of the chimpanzee. These results also revealed no prominent P3 to the human subjects' own names. The lack of increased P3 is therefore likely due to our experimental protocol, in which we presented the subject's own name relatively frequently. In contrast, our results revealed prominent negativity to the subject's own name at around 500 ms in the chimpanzee and around 200 ms in human subjects. This may indicate that initial orientation to the sound of one's own name is delayed in the chimpanzee.

    DOI: 10.4161/cib.4.3.14841

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  • Neural Correlates of Face and Object Perception in an Awake Chimpanzee (Pan Troglodytes) Examined by Scalp-Surface Event-Related Potentials Reviewed

    Hirokata Fukushima, Satoshi Hirata, Ari Ueno, Goh Matsuda, Kohki Fuwa, Keiko Sugama, Kiyo Kusunoki, Masahiro Hirai, Kazuo Hiraki, Masaki Tomonaga, Toshikazu Hasegawa

    PLOS ONE   5 ( 10 )   e13366   2010.10

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    Background: The neural system of our closest living relative, the chimpanzee, is a topic of increasing research interest. However, electrophysiological examinations of neural activity during visual processing in awake chimpanzees are currently lacking.
    Methodology/Principal Findings: In the present report, skin-surface event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were measured while a fully awake chimpanzee observed photographs of faces and objects in two experiments. In Experiment 1, human faces and stimuli composed of scrambled face images were displayed. In Experiment 2, three types of pictures (faces, flowers, and cars) were presented. The waveforms evoked by face stimuli were distinguished from other stimulus types, as reflected by an enhanced early positivity appearing before 200 ms post stimulus, and an enhanced late negativity after 200 ms, around posterior and occipito-temporal sites. Face-sensitive activity was clearly observed in both experiments. However, in contrast to the robustly observed face-evoked N170 component in humans, we found that faces did not elicit a peak in the latency range of 150-200 ms in either experiment.
    Conclusions/Significance: Although this pilot study examined a single subject and requires further examination, the observed scalp voltage patterns suggest that selective processing of faces in the chimpanzee brain can be detected by recording surface ERPs. In addition, this non-invasive method for examining an awake chimpanzee can be used to extend our knowledge of the characteristics of visual cognition in other primate species.

    DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0013366

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  • Brain activity in an awake chimpanzee in response to the sound of her own name Reviewed

    Ari Ueno, Satoshi Hirata, Kohki Fuwa, Keiko Sugama, Kiyo Kusunoki, Goh Matsuda, Hirokata Fukushima, Kazuo Hiraki, Masaki Tomonaga, Toshikazu Hasegawa

    BIOLOGY LETTERS   6 ( 3 )   311 - 313   2010.6

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:ROYAL SOC  

    The brain activity of a fully awake chimpanzee being presented with her name was investigated. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were measured for each of the following auditory stimuli: the vocal sound of the subject&apos;s own name (SON), the vocal sound of a familiar name of another group member, the vocal sound of an unfamiliar name and a non-vocal sound. Some differences in ERP waveforms were detected between kinds of stimuli at latencies at which P3 and Nc components are typically observed in humans. Following stimulus onset, an Nc-like negative shift at approximately 500 ms latency was observed, particularly in response to SON. Such specific ERP patterns suggest that the chimpanzee processes her name differently from other sounds.

    DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2009.0864

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  • The Effect of Manipulation on Self-Identification with a Game Character : An ERP Study

    MATSUDA Goh, HIRAKI Kazuo

    Cognitive studies   17 ( 1 )   241 - 245   2010.3

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:日本認知科学会  

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  • Auditory ERPs to Stimulus Deviance in an Awake Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes): Towards Hominid Cognitive Neurosciences Reviewed

    Ari Ueno, Satoshi Hirata, Kohki Fuwa, Keiko Sugama, Kiyo Kusunoki, Goh Matsuda, Hirokata Fukushima, Kazuo Hiraki, Masaki Tomonaga, Toshikazu Hasegawa

    PLOS ONE   3 ( 1 )   e1442   2008.1

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    Background. For decades, the chimpanzee, phylogenetically closest to humans, has been analyzed intensively in comparative cognitive studies. Other than the accumulation of behavioral data, the neural basis for cognitive processing in the chimpanzee remains to be clarified. To increase our knowledge on the evolutionary and neural basis of human cognition, comparative neurophysiological studies exploring endogenous neural activities in the awake state are needed. However, to date, such studies have rarely been reported in non-human hominid species, due to the practical difficulties in conducting non-invasive measurements on awake individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings. We measured auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) of a fully awake chimpanzee, with reference to a well-documented component of human studies, namely mismatch negativity (MMN). In response to infrequent, deviant tones that were delivered in a uniform sound stream, a comparable ERP component could be detected as negative deflections in early latencies. Conclusions/Significance. The present study reports the MMN-like component in a chimpanzee for the first time. In human studies, various ERP components, including MMN, are well-documented indicators of cognitive and neural processing. The results of the present study validate the use of noninvasive ERP measurements for studies on cognitive and neural processing in chimpanzees, and open the way for future studies comparing endogenous neural activities between humans and chimpanzees. This signifies an essential step in hominid cognitive neurosciences.

    DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0001442

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  • 3-4 Developing Mind and Media

    Kazuo Hiraki, Naoko Dan, Goh Matsuda

    Kyokai Joho Imeji Zasshi/Journal of the Institute of Image Information and Television Engineers   60 ( 11 )   1745 - 1748   2006.9

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:一般社団法人映像情報メディア学会  

    DOI: 10.3169/itej.60.1745

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  • Sustained decrease in oxygenated hemoglobin during video games in the dorsal prefrontal cortex: A NIRS study of children Reviewed

    G Matsuda, K Hiraki

    NEUROIMAGE   29 ( 3 )   706 - 711   2006.2

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE  

    Traditional neuroimaging studies have mainly focused on brain activity derived from a simple stimulus and task. Therefore, little is known about brain activity during daily operations. In this study, we investigated hemodynamic changes in the dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC) (luring video games as one of daily amusements, using near infrared spectroscopy technique. It was previously reported that oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) in adults' DPFC decreased during prolonged game playing time. In the present study, we examined whether similar changes were observed in children.
    Twenty children (7-14 years old) participated in our study, but only 13 of them were eventually subject to analysis. They played one or two commercially available video games; namely a fighting and a puzzle game, for 5 min. We used changes in concentration of oxyHb as an indicator of brain activity and consequently, most of the children exhibited a sustained game-related oxyHb decrease in DPFC. Decrease patterns of oxyHb in children during video game playing time did not differ from those in adults. There was no significant correlation between ages or game performances and changes in oxyHb. These findings suggest that game-related oxyHb decrease in DPFC is a common phenomenon to adults and children at least older than 7 years old, and we suggest that this probably results from attention demand from the video games rather than from subject's age and performance. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2005.08.019

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  • Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation During Video Game Play Reviewed

    Goh Matsuda, Kazuo Hiraki

    GAMING, SIMULATIONS, AND SOCIETY   101 - 109   2005

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (international conference proceedings)   Publisher:SPRINGER-VERLAG TOKYO  

    DOI: 10.1007/4-431-26797-2_11

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  • Decrease in prefrontal hemoglobin oxygenation during reaching tasks with delayed visual feedback: a near-infrared spectroscopy study Reviewed

    S Shimada, K Hiraki, G Matsuda, Oda, I

    COGNITIVE BRAIN RESEARCH   20 ( 3 )   480 - 490   2004.8

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV  

    Visual feedback of hand movement is crucial to accurate reaching. Although previous studies have extensively examined spatial alteration of visual feedback (e.g., prism adaptation), temporal delay of visual feedback has been less explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of delayed visual feedback of the moving hand in a reaching task. The prefrontal cortical activity was measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Twelve subjects performed reaching tasks under two conditions where visual feedback of their own hand was delayed by 200 ms (delay condition) or 0 ms (normal condition). Introducing the visual feedback delay significantly disrupted the reaching performance, although the subjects gradually adapted to the delay during the experiment. There was a clear tendency to overreach the target in the delay condition, even after the reaching movement bad been practiced sufficiently in the normal condition. We observed marked oxyand total-Hb decreases in the dorsal prefrontal area in the delay conditions. The decrease began shortly after task onset and diminished during the rest period, indicating that the decrease was task-induced. Furthermore, the oxy- and total-Hb decreases were significantly correlated with task performance-the degree of decrease was larger as the subject made more errors. We suggest that the decreases in oxy- and total-Hb at the dorsal prefrontal area are related with the visuomotor recalibration process. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2004.04.004

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  • 投稿論文 近赤外分光法によるテレビゲーム操作中の脳活動計測 Reviewed

    松田 剛, 開 一夫, 嶋田 総太郎

    シミュレーション&ゲーミング   13 ( 1 )   21 - 31   2003.6

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MISC

  • Evaluation of robot appearance using a brain science technique

    Goh Matsuda, Kazuo Hiraki, Kazuo Hiraki, Hiroshi Ishiguro

    Geminoid Studies: Science and Technologies for Humanlike Teleoperated Androids   157 - 162   2018.4

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    © Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018. We evaluate the humanlike-ness of humanoid robots using electroencephalography (EEG). As the activity of the human mirror-neuron system (MNS) is believed to reflect the humanlike-ness of observed agents, we compare the MNS activity of 17 participants while observing certain actions performed by a human, an extremely humanlike android, and a machine-like humanoid. We find the MNS to be significantly activated only when the participants observe actions performed by the human. Despite the participants&#039; rating of the android appearance as more humanlike than that of the robot, the MNS activity corresponding to each of the three agents does not differ. These findings suggest that appearance does not crucially affect MNS activity, and that factors such as motion should be targeted for improving the humanlike-ness of humanoid robots.

    DOI: 10.1007/978-981-10-8702-8_9

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Presentations

  • 研修医のコミュニケーションスキル・プロフェッショナリズム評価はコーチングで改善するか?

    滋賀 健介, 入江 仁, 松田 剛, 山脇 正永

    医学教育  2018.7 

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  • 在宅における摂食嚥下評価に基づいた摂食嚥下ケアプランの指導

    山根 由起子, 松田 剛, 阪下 早織, 奥村 由香理, 尾下 玲子, 森山 文則, 村上 成美, 小原 章央, 渡辺 康介, 山脇 正永

    日本在宅医学会大会  2018.4 

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  • 在宅医療研修における研修医と指導医の相互評価

    山根 由起子, 松田 剛, 神野 君夫, 土井 正樹, 渡辺 康介, 山脇 正永

    医学教育  2017.8 

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  • Facilitation of Swallowing by Swallowing Sounds

    松田剛, 山脇正永

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2017 

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  • ルーブリックを用いたフィードバック 神経内科後期研修に対する試み(第2報)

    滋賀 健介, 尾原 知行, 水野 敏樹, 松田 剛, 山脇 正永

    臨床神経学  2016.12 

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  • 指導医講習会におけるマイクロティーチングでのプレゼンテーションスキル相互評価

    滋賀 健介, 入江 仁, 十亀 義生, 松田 剛, 山脇 正永

    医学教育  2016.7 

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  • 馴化判定ソフト「HabiStation」の開発

    松田剛

    日本赤ちゃん学会学術集会プログラム・要旨集  2016.5 

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  • 嚥下運動のAutomatic imitation

    松田剛, 山脇正永

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2016 

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  • 夜間睡眠が翌日の認知能力に与える影響:13ケ月児を対象として

    松田剛, 松中玲子, 松中玲子, 開一夫, 開一夫

    日本赤ちゃん学会学術集会プログラム・要旨集  2015.6 

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  • 正義の肯定:乳児は弱者を脅威から守る他者を好むのか?

    鹿子木康弘, 井上康之, 松田剛, 開一夫, 明和政子

    日本赤ちゃん学会学術集会プログラム・要旨集  2015.6 

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  • 触覚刺激に対する注意に筋緊張が与える効果について

    漆原正貴, 松田剛, 玉宮義之, 開一夫

    認知科学  2014.12 

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  • 母子間相互作用の時間的操作が母親の対乳児動作に与える影響

    松田剛, 山本絵里子, 長田かおり, 旦直子, 開一夫

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2014 

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  • 母子間相互作用における時間的随伴性が子どもの模倣行動に及ぼす影響

    山本絵里子, 松田剛, 長田かおり, 旦直子, 開一夫

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2014 

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  • エビングハウス錯視は催眠で無効化できるか

    漆原正貴, 松田剛, 開一夫

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2014 

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  • 乳児は人間とアンドロイドを区別できるのか?視線計測による検討

    松田剛, 岡崎善弘, 鹿子木康弘, 石黒浩, 開一夫

    日本赤ちゃん学会学術集会プログラム・要旨集  2013.5 

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  • 触覚刺激に対する注意に筋緊張が与える効果について

    漆原正貴, 松田剛, 玉宮義之, 開一夫

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2013 

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  • 青筋漫符が怒り感情知覚に及ぼす影響

    林聖将, 玉宮義之, 松田剛, 開一夫

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2013 

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  • 乳児における「作る時間」の理解

    岡崎善弘, 松田剛, 小澤幸世, 山本絵里子, 開一夫

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2013 

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  • ネガティブ刺激および中性刺激がワーキングメモリに与える影響―NIRSによる認知神経科学的検討―

    小澤幸世, 松田剛, 開一夫

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2013 

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  • モーションコントローラは操作対象との一体感を増すのか?:生理指標による検討

    松田剛, 開一夫

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2013 

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  • 視線の先を表す手がかりが視線による操作感に与える影響

    鹿子木康弘, 松田剛, 開一夫

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2013 

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  • A Humanoid Robot Activates the Human Mirror Neuron System

    松田剛, 神田崇行, 石黒浩, 開一夫

    認知科学  2012.12 

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  • スピード線描写の違いが速さ知覚に及ぼす影響

    林聖将, 松田剛, 玉宮義之, 開一夫

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2012 

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  • Does a humanoid robot in front of you activate your mirror neuron system?

    Goh Matsuda, Kazuo Hiraki, Hiroshi Ishiguro

    Proceedings of the 34th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2012, Sapporo, Japan, August 1-4, 2012  2012 

  • Visual cognition of "speed lines" in comics: Experimental study on speed perception.

    Hiromasa Hayashi, Goh Matsuda, Yoshiyuki Tamamiya, Kazuo Hiraki

    Proceedings of the 34th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2012, Sapporo, Japan, August 1-4, 2012  2012 

  • マンガのスピード線が視覚的注意に及ぼす影響

    林聖将, 松田剛, 玉宮義之, 開一夫

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2011 

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  • NIRSによるワーキングメモリ課題を用いた読解力の神経基盤に関する研究

    安村明, 松田剛, 開一夫

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2011 

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  • ミラーニューロンシステムを指標とした「ヒトらしさ」の評価:アンドロイドはヒトかロボットか?

    松田剛, 開一夫, 石黒浩

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2011 

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  • 事象関連電位を指標としたゲームキャラクタの自己同一視に関する検討

    松田剛, 開一夫

    日本認知科学会大会発表論文集(CD-ROM)  2009 

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  • Joint Attention about human and robot

    ARITA AKIKO, KOMATSU TAKANORI, MATSUDA GOH, HIRAKI KAZUO, MATSUMOTO YOSHIO

    IPSJ SIG Notes. ICS  2001.10 

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    The purpose of this study is to investigate how human recognize the interacting robot, and how does it change in the course of interaction. To that end, we focused on "Joint Attention" and "Gaze Following" to recognize the human recognition, and we conducted experiments controlling the pattern of interaction. The results of two experiments suggests that the rate of gaze following to the robot doesn't depend on the pattern of robot action and the length of interaction, but depend on ISI(Inter-Stimulus Interval)which is the time from task to task.

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